U.S. Visitors for Business

If you are a foreign business professional that has business to conduct within the United States, a work visa is not always required. In some situations a B-1 business visitor visa is sufficient. There are several situations where business professionals can conduct business within the United States without the need of work authorization. Several factors are considered to determine if a B-1 business visitor is the best immigration option. Generally, a business visitor must be coming into the United States on a temporary basis, with the intent to return to their home Country when their temporary duties are complete. Additionally, they must be performing duties for a Non-U.S. employer and must receive no compensation from the United States.

The following is a list of questions that can be asked to determine your eligibility for a B-1 business visitor visa:

  • Is the business visitor coming to the United States to solicit sales, negotiate contracts, or take orders from established customers for work that will be performed outside the United States?
  • Is the business visitor a purchasing agent for a foreign employer coming to the United States to procure goods, components, or raw materials for use outside the United States?
  • Is the business visitor an employee of a foreign company coming to the United States with regard to service or sales contracts already undertaken by their company?
  • Is the business visitor coming to supervise or train others in construction work?
  • Is the business visitor an employee of a foreign-based company or office of a U.S. company coming to the United States to engage in consultations with U.S. business associates?
  • Is the business visitor coming to the United States in conjunction with litigation?
  • Is the business visitor coming to attend a professional or business conference, convention, or executive seminar?
  • Is the business visitor an employee or independent businessperson coming to the United States to undertake independent research such as market or product research, not directly connected with sales or service contracts or the solicitation of business?
  • Is the business visitor a professional coming to arrange employment in this country? (Interview for a job?)
  • Is the business visitor a foreign investor coming to the United States to take steps to set up their investment?
  • Is the business visitor coming to open or be employed in a U.S. office, subsidiary, or affiliate of the foreign employer in order to qualify for an L-1 visa?
  • Is the business visitor a professional that would qualify for an H-1B visa but is employed abroad?
  • Is the business visitor a member of a religious or charitable organization?
  • Is the business visitor coming to the United States to undertake an established training program that would qualify him/her for an H-3 visa?
  • Is the business visitor an employee of a foreign airline?
  • Is the business visitor a business executive or a member of a board of directors of a U.S. company?
  • Is the business visitor a personal or domestic servant coming to the United States with a U.S. citizen or nonimmigrant employer?
  • Is the business visitor a professional athlete attending a tournament?
  • Is the business visitor to be employed on the outercontinental shelf?

If you have questions about your potential business activities within the United States, contact Richards and Jurusik Immigration Law today so that we can determine the best available immigration option for you.

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